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Interior walls

Hi we renovated a house in Germany about 5 years ago, the internal walls have lime wash paint , over new lime plaster, we find that in some high traffic areas the plaster chipps easily and the paint is still dusty, I want to touch up these areas what is best to use ?thanks

6 thoughts on “Interior walls”

  • Adam Brown

    Good Afternoon

    If you are finding that a lime wash is not offering the durability you require you could look to use a mineral based paint. As this type of paint offers the vapour permeability of a lime wash with a significantly improved durability it would likely be the best option. Mineral paints come from Germany and i would recommend the following website - www.beeck.com

    We act as the UK stockist for Beeck, but their website should give you a list of contacts in Germany who will be able to provide in depth advice and supply you with a suitable paint.

    Kind Regards

    Adam Brown

    Reply
    • Mark

      Apologies for asking on an existing thread but I can't find how to ask a new question on the forum.
      I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The client requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 for the re-skimming

      Reply
      • Adam Brown

        Good Morning

        A lot will depend on the condition of the substrate as how best to move forward. We would recommend removing any existing paint coating so you are back to the underlying coat. Mechanically scratching would be something to avoid if you can, like you already mentioned the risk of causing damage is quite high. Sufficiently dampening is going to be the best option, you could make a slurry out of the CLM66 and paint this on, when this is still tacky you could lay your plaster coat into this. Another alternative is to use the Beeck Fixative (http://cornishlime.co.uk/beeck-fixative), this is mainly used as a primer for mineral paints and also for stabilising crumbling mineral substrates (stone, mortar etc.), Fixative works by chemically binding to the substrate and will harden the existing coating which is in place, through this process it will also help control some of the excess suction in the background and will have no impact on the technical performance of the original coating and contains no synthetic materials. If using the Fixaitve, this would need to be applied a few days before (ideally a week before) you intent to start plastering, you would still need to dampen down before skimming, but it should require much less water and give a more even suction in the background.

        If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact our office on 01208 79779.

        Kind Regards

        Adam

        Reply
  • Mark

    Apologies for asking on an existing thread but I can't find how to ask a new question on the forum.
    I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The client requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 for the re-skimming

    Reply
    • Adam Brown

      Good Morning

      A lot will depend on the condition of the substrate as how best to move forward. We would recommend removing any existing paint coating so you are back to the underlying coat. Mechanically scratching would be something to avoid if you can, like you already mentioned the risk of causing damage is quite high. Sufficiently dampening is going to be the best option, you could make a slurry out of the CLM66 and paint this on, when this is still tacky you could lay your plaster coat into this. Another alternative is to use the Beeck Fixative (http://cornishlime.co.uk/beeck-fixative), this is mainly used as a primer for mineral paints and also for stabilising crumbling mineral substrates (stone, mortar etc.), Fixative works by chemically binding to the substrate and will harden the existing coating which is in place, through this process it will also help control some of the excess suction in the background and will have no impact on the technical performance of the original coating and contains no synthetic materials. If using the Fixaitve, this would need to be applied a few days before (ideally a week before) you intent to start plastering, you would still need to dampen down before skimming, but it should require much less water and give a more even suction in the background.

      If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact our office on 01208 79779.

      Kind Regards

      Adam

      Reply
  • Mark

    Many thanks for your prompt reply. I'll pass on your advice and let you know how we get on. Cheers!

    Reply

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